Geography students use virtual reality to recreate Mayan ruins

Mayan Ruins

Ancient Mayan civilization in Central America, which collapsed around 1,000 years ago, is being brought to life in a new Penn State project. Two doctoral students in geography, Jiawei Huang and Arif Masrur, have recreated the Mayan ruins of Cahal Pech, in Belize, using virtual reality.

This project is through ChoroPhronensis, a research unit in Penn State’s Department of Geography founded by Alexander Klippel, professor of geography. Klippel's research focuses on immersive technologies and spatial information theory.

Female firefighters defy old ideas of who can be an American hero

female firefighters

Five women graduated from New York City’s Fire Academy on April 18, bringing the number of women serving in the Fire Department of New York to 72 – the highest in its history.

The FDNY’s 2018 graduating class also includes the first son to follow his mother into the profession. She was one of the 41 women hired in 1982 after the department lost a gender discrimination lawsuit and was ordered to add qualified women to the force.

Fighting fire with societal norms

United Women Firefighters training event

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — There are a few statistics about women firefighters that stand out to Penn State researcher Lorraine Dowler.

Women account for about 7 percent of firefighters nationwide. Men and women firefighters have the same average age, but women are paid $10,000 less, on average, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. Even in the San Francisco Fire Department, which has made great strides toward equal representation, just 15 percent of firefighters are women. In the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY), that figure is less than 1 percent.

Staff Appreciation Lunch

Date
April 23, 2018
Time
12:30 pm
Description

Please join us Tuesday, April 17, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in 319 Walker Building, for our annual Staff Appreciation Lunch. This event is sponsored by SWIG to thank our incredible staff for all of their patience, generosity, and hard work in keeping the department running.

We hope to see many of you there,

Lauren (on behalf of your SWIG officers) 

Cost
Free

Bringing forests of the future to life

Screen capture foreset futures

Story from Portland State University News

What if you could see what a forest might look like 50 or 100 years from now? Imagine being able to see how a warming climate turned a dense forest into sparser woodlands.

Soon, there will be an app for that. With just a smartphone and a cardboard headset, users will be able to immerse themselves in a forest years into the future.